Our Focus Areas

PART 1: Evaluation Questions

PART 1: Evaluation Questions

GENERAL PRACTICES

1.1 - Does the afterschool program have policies and programs in place to promote healthy eating and physical activity?

  • 3 = Yes.
  • 2 = There are policies and programs in place to promote some aspects of healthy eating and physical activity.
  • 1 = There are plans to put policies and programs in place.
  • 0 = No.

1.2 - Does the afterschool program have a group/individual that oversees afterschool policies and programs concerning physical activity and healthy eating? (“Oversees” refers to the following: The planning of structured activities for the afterschool program and an individual who leads and supervises the planned activities.)

  • 3 = Yes.
  • 2 = There is a group/individual who leads and supervises the planned activities.
  • 1 = There are structured plans present but no reliable group/individual leading and supervising the planned activities.
  • 0 = No.

1.3 - Does the program communicate physical activity and healthy eating policies and programs to parents and caregivers in the following ways:

  • Parent newsletters or flyers?
  • Sending explanations of afterschool program rules and expectations?
  • Posted messages placed in accessible locations?
  • 3 = Yes, all three ways are used.
  • 2 = Two of the ways are used.
  • 1 = Only one of the ways is used.
  • 0 = None are used.

1.4 - Does the afterschool program communicate its policies on physical activity and healthy eating to children, staff and visitors in the following ways?

  • Staff orientation
  • Explaining afterschool program rules and expectations
  • Behavior and rules of conduct postings
  • Program activity summary sheets
  • Special events (plays, seasonal events, performances)
  • 3 = Yes, all of the ways are used.
  • 2 = Three to four ways are used.
  • 1 = One to two ways are used.
  • 0 = None are used.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

2.1 - Are children provided with adequate time for physical activity during the program?

  • Physical activity time is scheduled into every session (day)
  • Children are scheduled to be physically active for at least 30 minutes at a time
  • An adult is present during physical activity time to encourage and promote continued physical activity
  • 3 = Yes, all three of the above criteria are met.
  • 2 = Two of the above criteria are met.
  • 1 = Only one of the above criteria is met.
  • 0 = There is no reliable or consistent afterschool physical activity time.

2.2 - Do the children participate in the provided physical activities?

  • 3 = All participate
  • 2 = Most (75% )
  • 1 = Half (50%)
  • 0 = Few (Less than 25%)

2.3 - Are the physical activity facilities and choices for children adequate in the following ways?

  • Both indoor and outdoor facilities are available to the children for physical activity.
  • All children can be physically active without overcrowding or safety risks.
  • There are adequate choices for children of various interests, skills and abilities to be physically active.
  • 3 = Yes, in all three ways described above.
  • 2 = In two ways.
  • 1 = In one way.
  • 0 = None.

2.4 - Does the physical education program promote child participation in a variety of community physical activity options through three or more of the following methods? (Examples of community physical activity options include clubs, teams, recreational classes, special events such as community fun runs, and use of playgrounds, parks, and bike paths.)

  • Bulletin boards
  • Guest speakers who promote community programs
  • Take-home flyers
  • Newsletter articles
  • Videos, DVD’s, or other digital materials
  • 3 = Yes, through three or more methods.
  • 2 = Through two methods.
  • 1 = Through only one method.
  • 0 = The program does not promote participation in community physical activity options, or there is no physical education program.

2.5 - Does the afterschool program prohibit (forbid) using and withholding physical activity as punishment? Is it clearly communicated to the responsible group/individual and consistently followed? (Using physical activity as punishment means making children run laps or do push-ups as a consequence of inappropriate behavior. Witholding physical activity as punishment means not allowing children to attend physical activity.)

  • 3 = Yes, the use of physical activity as punishment and the withholding of physical activity as punishment are both prohibitions that are consistently followed.
  • 2 = One of these practices is prohibited, and the prohibition is consistently followed.
  • 1 = One of these practices is prohibited, but the prohibition is not consistently followed.
  • 0 = Neither of these practices is prohibited.

2.6a - Does the physical education curriculum address all of the following essential topics on physical activity?

  • Examples of physical activity and physical inactivity
  • Ways to increase daily physical activity
  • Opportunities for physical activity at school and in the community
  • Role of physical activity in maintaining a healthy weight and disease prevention
  • Influence of culture and media on physical activity
  • Goal-setting and decision-making skills for physical activity
  • Basic safety precautions during physical activity (stretching and injury prevention, safety equipment, climate-related precautions)
  • The importance of drinking water before, during, and after physical activity
  • 3 = Yes, addresses all eight of these topics.
  • 2 = Addresses five to seven of these topics.
  • 1 = Addresses two to four of these topics.
  • 0 = Addresses one or none of these topics, or there is no health education curriculum.

2.6b - Does the program provide staff with the following physical activity training?

  • Provides staff with current professional materials (books, articles, tool kits, fact sheets)
  • Provides support for staff to attend physical education-related courses, conferences, and workshops
  • Staff have opportunities to share ideas and materials with each other
  • Staff can request help and guidance from supervisor
  • 3 = Yes, provides staff with all four listed training methods.
  • 2 = Provides staff with three of these training methods.
  • 1 = Provides staff with one or two of these training methods.
  • 0 = Provides no physical activity training.

NUTRITION

3.1 - Does the afterschool program prohibit (forbid) giving children lownutritive foods as rewards and withholding food as punishment? Are these practices clearly communicated to the responsible group/ individual and consistently followed? (Low nutritive foods provide calories primarily in the form of solid fat and/or sugars but contain few vitamins or minerals. Examples include candy, fried chips, and soft drinks. An example of using food as a reward is to provide candy or fast-food coupons to children because they have behaved well. An example of withholding food as a punishment is not giving one child a snack or meal, which is offered to all other children, because of that child’s inappropriate behavior.)

  • 3 = Yes, the use of low nutritive food as a reward and the withholding of food as punishment are prohibited, and both prohibitions are consistently followed.
  • 2 = One of these practices is prohibited, and the prohibition is consistently followed.
  • 1 = One of these practices is prohibited, but the prohibition is not consistently followed.
  • 0 = Neither practice is prohibited.

3.2 - Do snacks include at least one appealing, low-fat dairy product, whole fruit, vegetable, whole grain product or healthy protein (nuts, seeds, legumes) every day? (Appealing items are food items that are acceptable to a majority of children, as indicated by some kind of evaluation such as analysis of plate waste or child choices. Low-fat means items that contain no more than three grams of fat per serving. In most cases, fried potatoes, other fried foods, foods cooked with or covered with butter or margarine, pies, cobblers, cookies, cakes, and other pastries are not low-fat.)

  • 3 = Yes, snacks include at least one appealing, low-fat item from one of these three food groups everyday.
  • 2 = Snacks include at least one appealing, low-fat item from one of these food groups most days (3-4 days a week).
  • 1 = Snacks include at least one appealing, low-fat item from one of these food groups some days (1-2 days a week).
  • 0 = Snacks do not include appealing, low-fat items from any of these three food groups.

3.3 - Does the program have the ability to choose the foods served at snack time?

  • 3 = Yes.
  • 2 = Our food is provided by a company and our program can select among limited food options.
  • 1 = Our food is provided by a company with a fixed menu. However, our program may make suggestions for changes.
  • 0 = No.

3.4 - Does the program have the capability of on-site food preparation?

  • The program has cold storage capabilities
  • The program has adequate equipment for hot food preparation (stove, microwave)
  • The program has space for safe food preparation (chopping, mixing, sorting)
  • The program has space for children to participate in food preparation
  • 3 = The program has all of these capabilities.
  • 2 = The program has three of these capabilities.
  • 1 = The program has one or two of these capabilities.
  • 0 = The program has none of these capabilities.

3.4a - If your program serves an evening meal, does the meal include at least two of the following: low-fat dairy product, whole grain product, whole fruit, vegetable, or healthy protein (nuts, seeds, legumes, or low fat meat, fish, or poultry)? (Appealing items are food items that are acceptable to a majority of children, as indicated by some kind of evaluation such as analysis of plate waste or child choices. Low-fat means items that contain no more than three grams of fat per serving. In most cases, fried potatoes, other fried foods, foods cooked with or covered with butter or margarine, pies, cobblers, cookies, cakes, and other pastries are not low-fat.)

  • 3 = Yes, meals include at least two appealing, low-fat items from one of these five food groups every day.
  • 2 = Meals include at least two appealing, low-fat items from one of these food groups most days (three to four days a week).
  • 1 = Include at least two appealing, low-fat items from one of these food groups some days (one to two days a week).
  • 0 = Meals do not include appealing, low-fat items from any of these five food groups.

3.5 - What percentage of the children wash their hands before snack time?

  • 3 = All.
  • 2 = Most (75%).
  • 1 = Half (50%) .
  • 0 = Few (Less than 25%).

3.6 - Do children have at least 15 scheduled minutes to eat snacks during the afterschool program?

  • 3 = Yes.
  • 2 = Adequate time for eating snacks, but not during scheduled snack time.
  • 1 = There are plans to include a scheduled snack time.
  • 0 = No. There is no designated snack time.

3.7 - Eating time is planned as a learning experience and discussion time. (For example, including a discussion of children’s interests and events of the day or sharing information about the nutritional value of food.)

  • 3 = Yes, every day.
  • 2 = Most of the time (three to four days).
  • 1 = Some of the time (one to two days).
  • 0 = Never.

3.8 - Information is shared with parents about the following topics: the menu, nutritional value of foods and children’s eating habits.

  • 1 = All three topics.
  • 2 = Two topics.
  • 1 = One topics.
  • 0 = None of the above.

3.9 - Do most or all sites on program grounds offer appealing, low-fat dairy products, whole fruits, vegetables, or healthy protein (nuts, seeds, legumes)?

Examples of sites on program grounds include:

  • Vending machines
  • Canteens / Cafeterias
  • Concession stands
  • Parties and special events
  • Meetings
  • 3 = Yes, most or all sites on program grounds do.
  • 2 = About half the sites do.
  • 1 = Fewer than half the sites do.
  • 0 = None of the sites do.

3.10 - Do program fundraising efforts support healthy eating by selling non-food items or foods that are low in fat, sodium, and added sugars (e.g., fruits, vegetables, pretzels, air-popped popcorn) instead of by selling foods that are high in fat, sodium, or added sugars (e.g., candy)?

  • 3 = Yes, fundraising efforts support healthy eating and never include selling foods high in fat, sodium, or added sugars.
  • 2 = Fundraising efforts rarely include selling foods high in fat, sodium, or added sugars.
  • 1 = Fundraising efforts include selling foods high in fat, sodium, or added sugars about half the time.
  • 0 = Fundraising efforts typically include selling foods high in fat, sodium, or added sugars.

3.11a - Does the nutrition education curriculum address all of these essential healthy eating topics?

Nutrition Basics

  • Benefits of healthy eating
  • Importance of eating a healthy breakfast
  • Nutritious choices from each food group
  • Importance of and ways to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables
  • Importance of and ways to drink plenty of water and other nutritious beverages
  • Food safety, including hand washing and safe food preparation/storage

Healthy Choices

  • Goal-setting and decision-making skills for healthy eating
  • Balancing food intake and physical activity
  • Importance of and ways to consume foods and beverages that are low in fat and added sugars
  • Preparation of a variety of healthy snacks

Nutrition as it relates to the surrounding environment

  • Importance of moderation in a person’s eating habits
  • Using food labels
  • How children can influence and support others to engage in healthy eating
  • Influence of personal preferences, family, media, and culture on dietary behavior
  • Accepting body size differences
  • Recognizing hunger and satiety cues
  • 3 = Yes, addresses all of these topics.
  • 2 = Addresses most of these topics.
  • 1 = Addresses some of these topics.
  • 0 = Addresses one or none of these topics, or there is no health education curriculum.

3.11b - Does program provide staff with nutrition training?

  • Provides staff with current professional materials (books, articles, tool kits, fact sheets)
  • Provides support for staff to attend nutrition education-related courses, conferences, and workshops
  • Staff have opportunities to share ideas and materials with each other
  • Staff can request help and guidance from supervisor
  • 3 = Yes, provides staff with all listed training methods.
  • 2 = Provides staff with most of these training methods.
  • 1 = Provides staff with some of these training methods.
  • 0 = Does not provide nutrition activity training.

Is the child’s medical information that is relevant to special dietary needs (e.g., diabetes, food allergies) collected at least once a year and updated during the year if needed? When necessary, and when parents or guardians give permission, is all pertinent information communicated to all appropriate program personnel?

All pertinent information includes:

  • Signs or symptoms to watch for in the child
  • Specific action to take if child exhibits signs or symptoms
  • Special precautions, if needed
  • Preventive actions, if needed
  • A reminder about the confidentiality of this information

Examples of appropriate program personnel include

  • Food service staff
  • Physical education teachers
  • Supervisors of before and afterschool programs
  • 3 = Yes, all pertinent information is collected and is communicated to all appropriate personnel.
  • 2 = All pertinent information is collected and is communicated to some, but not all appropriate personnel.
  • 1 = Some, but not all pertinent information is collected.
  • 0 = Pertinent information is not collected at the beginning of the school year or updated during the year, if needed.

STAFF SUPPORT

Does the program offer staff members physical health screenings that are accessible and free or low-cost at least once a year? (“Offer” means that the program has a special arrangement for staff to receive health screening either on-site or through a community program off-site. This screening could be part of the employee benefits package, the wellness program, or the employee assistance program.)

Examples of items that are part of health screenings include:

  • Height and weight
  • Blood pressure
  • Cholesterol level
  • Blood sugar level
  • Tobacco use
  • Alcohol and substance use
  • Safety (e.g., seat belts, helmets, smoke alarms, drinking and driving)
  • Mental health
  • 3 = Yes.
  • 2 = Offers physical health screenings, but some staff members find them inaccessible or expensive.
  • 1 = Offers health screenings, but many staff members find them inaccessible or expensive.
  • 0 = Does not offer health screenings at least once a year.

4.2a - Does the program offer staff members physical activity/fitness programs that are accessible and free or low-cost? (“Offer” means that the program has a special arrangement for staff to participate in physical activity/fitness programs either on-site or through a community program off-site. Physical activity/ fitness programs include classes, workshops, and special events.)

  • 3 = Yes.
  • 2 = Offers physical activity/fitness programs, but some staff members find them inaccessible or expensive.
  • 1 = Offers physical activity/fitness programs, but many staff members find them inaccessible or expensive.
  • 0 = Does not offer physical activity/fitness programs.

4.2b - Does the program offer staff members healthy eating/weight management programs that are accessible and free or low-cost? (“Offer” means that the program has a special arrangement for staff to participate in healthy eating/weight management programs either on-site or through a community program off-site.)

  • 3 = Yes.
  • 2 = Offers healthy eating/weight management programs, but some staff members find them inaccessible or expensive.
  • 1 = Offers healthy eating/weight management programs, but many staff members find them inaccessible or expensive.
  • 0 = Does not offer healthy eating/weight management programs.

1.0 GENERAL PRACTICES SCORE 1.1 Does the afterschool program have policies and programs in place to promote healthy eating and physical activity?     1.2 Does the after school program have a group/individual that manages after school policies and programs concerning physical activity and healthy eating?     1.3 Does the program communicate physical activity and healthy eating policies and programs to parents and caregivers?     1.4 Does the afterschool program communicate its policies on physical activity and healthy eating to children, staff and visitors?    

2.0 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY SCORE 2.1 Are children provided with adequate time for physical activity during the program?     2.2 Do the children participate in the provided physical activities?     2.3 Are the physical activity facilities and choices for children adequate?     2.4 Does the physical education program promote child participation in a variety of community physical activity options through three or more methods?     2.5 Does the afterschool program prohibit (forbid) using and withholding physical activity as punishment?     2.6a Does the physical education curriculum address all essential topics?     2.6b Does program provide staff with physical activity training?    

3.0 NUTRITION SCORE 3.1 Does the afterschool program prohibit (forbid) giving children low nutritive food as reward and withholding food as punishment?     3.2 Do snacks include at least one appealing, low-fat dairy product, whole fruit, vegetable, whole grain product or healthy protein (nuts, seeds, legumes) every day?     3.3 Does the program have the ability to choose the foods served at snack time?     3.4 Does the program have the capability of on-site food preparation?     3.4a If your program serves supper, does the meal include at least two of the following: low-fat dairy product, whole grain product, whole fruit, vegetable, or healthy protein (nuts, seeds, legumes, or low-fat meat, fish, or poultry)?     3.5 Do children wash their hands before snack time?     3.6 Do children have at least 15 scheduled minutes to eat snacks during the afterschool program?     3.7 Is eating time planned as a learning experience and discussion time?     3.8 Is information shared with parents about the menu, nutritional value of foods and children’s eating habits?     3.9 Do most or all sites on program grounds offer appealing, low-fat choices?     3.10 Do program fundraising efforts support healthy eating by selling non-food items or foods that are low in fat, sodium, and added sugars?     3.11a Does the nutrition education curriculum address all essential healthy eating topics?     3.11b Does program provide staff with nutrition training?     3.12 Is the child’s medical information that is relevant to special dietary needs available?    

4.0 STAFF SUPPORT SCORE 4.1 Does the program offer staff members physical health screenings that are accessible and free or low-cost at least once a year?    

4.2a Does the program offer staff members healthy eating/weight management programs that are accessible and free or low-cost?    

4.2b Does the program offer staff members physical activity/fitness programs that are accessible and free or low-cost?    

Questions, Comments, Concerns and/or Notes for Discussion: